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Phys. Rev. X Quantum

It is a new journal that has been recently announced by the American Physical Society (APS). It is introduced as "a highly selective, open access journal featuring quantum information science and technology research with an emphasis on lasting and profound impact."

But why? Both Phys. Rev. Research and Phys. Rev. X perfectly cover the remit. It is very disappointing that APS now decides still to play the game of new journals for new trendy topics. I welcomed Phys. Rev. Research  as a step in the right direction (see previous post). I am afraid Phys. Rev. X Quantum goes in the wrong direction, both as a new topical journal and as a highly selective one. My reasons for this are presented in an earlier post. Sadly, APS is following the path defined by others, in a competition among publishers that does not serve the community, and in which it has few chances to maintain (regain?) leadership. 

Of course, I have absolutely nothing against the Quantum community, whatever its definition. I would react equally to any announcement of new topical journal at this time. There are better ways to target that community or any other that may evolve within physics and out of physics. Think of collections within PRR and/or PRX, campains to encourage submissions etc, together with carefully chosen tags. Much better suited to a dynamical, vibrant research field (I am referring to physics) than starting a new journal for every new trend. 

I was probably naive in expecting the APS (Publishing) to lead in a new direction, admittedly disruptive, but, to my mind, better serving the physics community. We, members of the APS, should probably push the publishing wing of our organisation. We may need open debate about this within the membership.

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